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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 250 to 299 of about 980 (some duplicates have been removed)
met kpapt tigss and boeing and proctor & gamble beat expectations. among technology and internet companies, facebook and dwra hao beat expectations but facebook and disappointed. the ipad mini is lighter than the full size ipad and 7.9 inches and $329. two product launches for microsoft introducing windows 8 than tablet, the surface which retails for $499. it's been anything bau strong earnings season so far. have companies squeezed all of the profits they can from the revenues get? and what affect will the elections have on the market? joining me is bob doll from black rock. thank you for joining us. >> thank you, maria. >> let's talk about earnings. we have seen disappointments in technology. how would you characterize the earnings season so far. >> mixed at best. the expectations have been lower ed the last 60 or so days. while companies on average are beating those they are low expectations and as you hinted the revenue line is disappointing. i'd add on top of that looks like analyst expectations for the fourth quarter and next year are on the high side. >> i have to come dow
be scanned optically. the state of virginia also use that technology. in pennsylvania, "the wall street journal" reporting that officials say counties should have enough paper ballots for 20% to 25% of expected voters because touch screen voting machines may be expected to run on battery power if they have to. it's a mixed bag. all the states have to reach out and find out what their needs are, carol. >> the most impacted states, of course, new jersey and new york are pretty much blue states. what if this happened in ohio? >> yeah, i know. but, you know and i know, carol, we both come from ohio. and we also know that people there are pretty hardy and the weather has to get pretty darp bad before people say they've got a real problem. big picture, though. it's pretty clear that the state has emergency rules that govern natural disasters, the state needs to follow its own rule. new york has a rule that might be construed to say if you have an emergency affecting a threshold portion of the voting population in a particular area, you can extend the election one day at a time for up to 20 da
in the world. we're blessed with terrific soldiers and extraordinary technology and intelligence. but the idea of a trillion dollars in cuts through sequestration and budget cuts to the military would change that. we need to have strong allies. our association and -- and connection with our allies is essential to america's strength. we're the -- the great nation that has allies, 42 allies and friends around the world. and finally, we have to stand by our principles. and if we're strong in each of those things, american influence will grow. but unfortunately, in nowhere in the world is america's influence greater today than it was four years ago. >> all right. >> and that's because we've become weaker on each of those four dimensions. >> all right -- perfect. you're going to get a chance to respond to that because that's a perfect segue into our next segment, and that is what is america's role in the world. and that is the question. what do each of you see as our role in the world? and i believe, governor romney, it's your turn to go first. >> well, i -- i absolutely believe that america has a
about by forces that are larger than our own society, globalization, the reach of technology and channg demographics. and within that, i felt that america was at a time when we desperately needed to have the strongest possible value space. we needed to be more in touch with the best of the american idea, the best aspects of the american idea. >> brown: value space you say. well, i say the value space. the space where we talk about why we do things, not what we're going to do. i felt that space had emptied out. we had had a very tough first decade of this century. i thought the conservate vision of small government, low tas, big defense, had played itself out and that progressives, liberals, we were flat on our back. >> brown: you use this term hand making i implies a sense of craft, a hands-on. your own background i know from being involved in folklore and music. >> yes. i'm a folklorist and amuse i cannologist. that colors my perspective. i reach back for the foundation of my argument to the late 19th century, to that other transition, the industrial revolution, and the krettics who p
. but this election is different. today digal technology has given campaigns the ability to take that data and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to ju the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be other inform
in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water clos
protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> we have lots of new poll numbers in the presidential race. let's go to the "hardball" scoreboard. in florida where a new cnn poll has mitt romney leading by one point. 50-49. a new pp poll from florida has president obama up by one point, 49-48. in ohio a new ppp poll has president lead big four, 51-47. next new hampshire, a small state that may play a big role on election night, the new ppp poll has the president up by two the
technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. during our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set-while supplies last. sale ends soon! you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly. in the weekdays with bernie segment tonight. after the storm chaos subsides most likely on thursday
together has never worked so well. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> want to take you to the city of hoboken, new jersey, right now. this tightly packed hamlet of 50,000 people is an exception to the falling floodwaters because at last report there were thousands of people still trapped. this is wednesday. still trapped or stranded amid the floodwater that is are contaminated with sewage and gasoline and who knows what else? last night after pleading of hoboken's mayor, here's the national guard. they finally arrived to help carry out the rescues so badly needed in hoboken. so you can see the pain and trus frags in the mayor voice, she was sh
groups use of technology. he also echoed others about the voters themselves. >> they're very independent minded. they are hard-working, working class citizens that vote for the person. they think the person is the best-- the person that most exemplifies who they are and will do the best job for them. so i think what you see here in green bay is a microcosm of what you see all across this state, the people want a new direction. >> reporter: given recent shifts here, though, the question in wisconsin remains: which really is the new direction? one prominent local citizen isn't tipping his hand. we met green bay mayor jim schmitt at a.l.s. hamburger shop. i noticed you're not endorsing either candidate. why's that? >> no. you what... what? look, i'm the mayor. i know who i want to be mayor, but when it comes to... >> reporter: you feel good about that one! >> i feel pretty good about that endorsement. >> reporter: mayor schmitt may be the smartest politician around. with a constituency fiercely divided and independent, he directed us to his own house a few blocks away. there we found one si
. it sounds high to me. green energy is expensive because we do not have the technology right now i think to certainly -- let's talk about wind power. it is very expensive to have the idea of wind power because you can still generate that energy much cheaper using coal. as we invest more and produce more here in ohio or elsewhere in the country, green energy costs will come down. ohio has tried to make its of a leader on the wind turbine, wind energy. there are programs in ohio that are trying to put stuff on lake erie but it is very expensive to get started. i think that is part of what we are limited on the green energy right now. host: a question on twitter from jim writes -- guest: i'm sure autoworkers will love that but there is a thing called tariffs that make those cars pretty expensive. they look at the ability to serve a market more directly and more cheaply than over in china. you almost have to have the reverse argument. we want to build cars here and china wants to build them their. host: another call on the line. sheila is waiting. caller: hello? well, i'll tell you what. rig
of globalization changes in technology that have advantaged the educated of those with high skills at the expense of the uneducated. and there clearly there is some truth to this story that education matters more on determining economic rewards. but the more we looked at this, the less satisfied we were that explanation. that it couldn't explain why the economic gains were so concentr ed within a very small subset of the educated people in american society. i mean 29% of americans now have college degrees but much, much smaller percentage of amerans were benefiting from this economic transformation. >> well as we speak i can hear all of those free-marketers out they say "come on, piers -- come on hacker, it is the global economy. it's the cheap labor overseas. it's those high-technology skills that you say are required, these deep forces that actually are beyond our control, d are making inevitable this division between the top and everyone else," right? that's what they were saying as they listen to you right now. >> we think the story that's told about how the global economy has shifted clearly
what soup can do. but kate -- still looks like...kate. nice'n easy with colorblend technology gives expert highlights and lowlights. for color that's true to you. i don't know how she does it. with nice'n easy, all they see is you. >>> ♪ >> a little bon jovi. where i will spend my life tuesday night. look at my men all hard at work, and women. they're all hard workers, putting together what i think is an extraordinary setup, the best technology available. accurate technology, which is most important on that night. they're putting together a pretty awesome set up. i'm even told that i'll even be on the ice rink. yes. with uhs on. thank you, guys. and of course the ladies on the team as well who worked so hard to make it pretty awesome to work here. time for a second saturday edition of the news nation gut check. this is a busy weekend for the presidential candidates as may make their final push before election day. we told you earlier a lot of their time spent in ohio. we've talked exhaustively about ohio, a phenomenal state, we know, that a state that matters. what does your gut t
the best and i am short the rest. sector analysis is particularly important technology. people confuse this gigantic group of stocks which comprises more than 15% of the s & p 500 constantly. tack tech is a whole group of markets. infrastructure stocks, assemblers, each have a separate growth rate. here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rate of the companies i follow versus the individual prices of the sector. the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example, are highly valued. price rates to growth earnings are extreme. that means there's no room for error, a chunk that could upset the growth rate. in 2011 one of my favorite cloud stocks -- it got pancaked and stayed ugly for a long time. why? because it underperformed its portion of the technology sector even as its growth rate would have been outstanding for say a personal computer-related stock or a disc drive, a semiconductor or cell phone company. these days knowing what the sector is isn't enough. you need to note sub sector. you need to know how your company s
that the technology changes the cost of these resources. doesn't just unleash them. but eventually the technology makes our resources competitive with declining resources in the middle east. but your point on jobs is the one i'm most interested in as well. most people think of these jobs as hard-hat jobs. guys in the field drilling and digging. they are. they're high value jobs but they generate jobs in the information technology industry, health care industry, manufacturing industry. in fact ohio has under construction a almost billion dollar steel mill for the first time in junk town, ohio. -- youngstown, ohio. it is being built to provide oil and gas manufacturing pipe for the state of ohio. ohio and dozen other swing states are enjoying a boom because of cheap natural gas. melissa: i do you one better. cheap and abundant natural gas and energy to fuel it and comes full circle. thanks for coming on. i wish we had more time. >> thank you. melissa: sandy on the brink of landfall. hundreds of thousands are already without power. floodwaters are rising. look at that. we have new details on the sto
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
of the market, virtually without fail. as all things technology rallied close to the holidays, the corporate technology budget flush this year, not happening at all. tech has been getting slaughtered. is this a temporary problem or something more permanent, more persistent happening out there? perhaps being caused by the decline of the desk top? the whole tech sector needs a checkup. no better place than avnet. avnet is the ultimate thermometer around. this company i like to call the biggest supermarket of tech on earth. the distributor of electronic components and one of the largest distributors of hardware. and they preannounced on the downside, the stock just got obliterated. more important, a powerful sign of tech's weakness, and today, the company reported, and avnet missed earnings estimates by a penny, they came in light, 8.7% year over year. and avnet's guidance, better than most people expecting. what worries me, avnet's weakness didn't come from europe, it didn't come from china, where many people are worried about the slowdown. the killer region was the americas. revenues down 14%
, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a belter tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's about 8:00 p.m. eastern time two fridays before the election and according to the app on my iphone, we have 10 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes and 53 seconds before the polls close. accord dog every one of what seems like a thousand polls taken this week, this thing say true dead heat. so what are the candidates up to? they are releasing new ads every day. it's said that character is what we do when no one is looking. mitt romney thought no one was looking when he attacked 47% of americans. his company shipped jobs overseas. >> higher deficits, chronic unemployment, a president who admits he can't work with congress. >> you can't change
without fail. as all things technology rallied close to the holidays, the corporate technology budget flush, this year, not happening at all. tech has been getting slaughtered. is this a temporary problem or something more permanent, more persistent happening out there? perhaps being caused by the decline of the desk top? the whole tech sector needs a checkup. no better place than avnet. avnet is the ultimate thermometer around. this company i like to call the biggest supermarket of tech on earth. the distributor of electronic components and one of the largest distributors of hardware. and they preannounced on the downside, the stock just got obliterated. more important, a powerful sign of tech's weakness, and today, the company reported, and avnet missed earnings estimates by a penny, they came in light, 8.7% year over year. and avnet's guidance, better than most people expecting. what worries me, avnet's weakness didn't come from europe, it didn't come from china, where many people are worried about the slowdown. the killer region was the americas. revenues down 14%, sequentially an
the technology in our ships was the best in the world. the results are true, that the training and the spirit of our sailors was superb. and we had absolutely first-class leadership in the navy. you will hear later today from admiral gary some examples of just how impressive that leadership is. the operational readiness of the fleet was a result, first of all, of having bases all around the world. but secondly because the strong program of exercise we conducted. the exercises were not only conducted on military scenarios, but we had an extensive set of exercises involved in humanitarian response. during the time i was secretary, we had a disaster response very similar to the one they're doing here in san francisco today. we bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even
the resolve and the resiliencke of these people. technology obviously was impacted so in order to get us a letter in the quickest amount of time possible, they typed it on an old typewriter, took a picture of it and emailed us the jpeg. no scaner, nothing like that, it was a jpeg of a leg. i said, good enough, it's a letter. we took that to ann kronenberg and said here we are, what can we do. in the meantime we did some brain storms, is this something real, is there any value we can add to this scenario? what we came up with was obviously we don't have the deep pockets to send over rebuilding teams or send over thousands and thousands of tons of material, that's just not what we could do. but what we could do is assemble a small team to go on a mission to van and meet them and talk to them and find out more about what do they need and is there an intersection of what we can do for them and in the meantime it gives us an opportunity to really look and see what the situation was and what we can take away from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in government understan
the obama war on coal and the effort to crimp natural gas and the very technology that produces it. [applause] we're going to support nuclear and renewables and phase out once an industry is on its feet. and rather than vesting in solar we'll invest in signs science and research and by 2020 we will achieve north american energy independence. [applause] we'll make trade work for america. we'll open more markets for american agriculture and we'll hold accountable any nation that doesn't play by the rules. i'm going to stand up for the rights and interest of american workers and employers. and we're going to grow jobs by make ug america the best place for business and manufacturers. this will mean updating regulations while lowering deductions and closing loopholes and make it clear that unlike the current administration, we actually like business and the jobs that business creates. [applause] and finally, as we create more opportunity, we'll make sure that our citizens have the skills they need. training programs will be where the people live and schools will put the interest of our
with the most modern technology and 60 beds. he says there will treat anyone who comes for free. the intensive care unit is also finished. for months, the government refused to issue the clinic with the necessary permits because it was funded by ivanishvili. at least that might be resolved now that he is taking over as prime minister. he sees himself as the harbinger of a real democracy. he says he's giving the people of georgia and opportunity. they voted out the old government and if they don't like him, they can vote him out, too. >> piece is not something that simply happens. you have to work hard to achieve it. those were most committed deserve public recognition. that is what alfred nobel believed. for more than a century now, each year, individuals or the award in his name. this year, the prize goes to the eu. the prize reminds everyone there is peace in europe because of the eu. >> it is business as usual at the european union district in brussels. you would hardly know the eu had just won one of the greatest honors in the world, of the peace prize. >> we've been in brussels for two da
for the public if they would like to pick up copies of it. and we hope that the technology supports us. >> so commissioners this is, as for the last three years we have been in a process of rethinking general education transportation services. and we are in the presentation tonight, going to share what our budget reduction goals are for the 2013-14 school year. and go over what the approach for developing recommendations for year 3 of changes, and then going into a description of what those recommendations are. the impact of the changes, and an overview of the next steps and the description of some alternatives to yellow bus transportation. in the appendix, just for context, this is an overview of the board's policy guidelines and an overview of the general education transportation services currently available and a summary of the changes that have taken place over the last two years. so i will start with the budget reduction goal. as you know, we are trying to minimize the use of general fund contributions for general education transportation. and so, we need to reduce the fleet by 5 buss fr
in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. what we know isboron is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of the republican par
've championed the overhaul of our city's information technology. because we've had to balance massive budget deficits for years, i reform now requiring multi-year planning financial1 and savings. to make government more accountable i passed new ethics rules demanding more disclosure by lobbyists and to protect our environment i passed four, first in the country environmental fké the process. now, i am proud of whatcgçdwe've accomplished together over the past four years but-2z i do have opp trying to stop us from moving our neighborhoods forward,#lx$s fighting the north beach library, opposing probota opposing will help the wong playground in chinatown. we know how important this election is. we hav neighborhood forward by focusing on resultsdx based politics. now i may not easily fit@óq defined political fashions but i measure my(fz impact by how we are improving people's lives. my values have been strong and consistent.g4g&c @&c"p içg san franciscans first, fighting for our neighborhoods, for ouréwtu families for our jobs
angels and a possible new warrior stadium and technology and creatively innovate the transportation system but it's the investment and success of the neighborhoods in san francisco because that's what counts. when a neighborhood is strong a city is strong and that is a message that can't be missed and we can't lose sight of that and thank you hud for the grant and believing in our city's comprehensive approach to improve public housing and it's nice that we received two. that'sow awesome we are and i want to say thank you very much. >> well ladies and gentlemen i'm going to wrap up. i'm going to take about two minutes. i just need to thank a bunch of folks and of course mayor lee thank you for had opportunity. i know last time i did this dancing and that's not going to happen today but i am shouting and carrying on but we're not dancing. we have dr. hernandez and chairman and the commissioners and i think allen is here and the public tenant housing and gina and lots of associates and i want alex to step out for a second. we couldn't do this without speaker -- i mean leader pel
is the ipad and technology. it will help provide opportunities in rural and urban areas with the best teachers and technology and will end up reducing the cost of education. we have to look a better way to do things with higher-quality. >> have we ever spent too much for education and is there ever enough money? >> we have never spent too much. i want to comment on the ratings. steve forbes or ran for president as a republican. he says north carolina has the third best business rating. we are above south carolina. we want to do better and we need to do better. a lot of our economy is the trade policy and the credit policy from the federal government eight years ago. on the $3 billion, he is wrong on that and the fact check will show he is wrong. we spent $800 million for hurricane floyd to help the rocky mount audience that is out there today. on education, in today's world, we are not going to out recruit any state or country unless we out educate them. it is a knowledge-based economy and we have to invest in education. the cuts that he supported and will rubber-stamp should he be governor ha
-- >> i wondered about that. but you can? >> yes. there are aboccasions called color line technologies, a lot of them developed right here in the bay area in the silicon valley, these little companies are developing things that are truly color blind. >> that is amazing. right here in the bay area. >> absolutely. so, you can treat hyper pigmentation. what are other risks of people of skin of color. i know a myth is they can't get skin cancer. >> that is a big myth. i point to bob marley who passed away from melanoma, so, i tell people use the sunscreen as soon as possible. although it is not as high as caucasian people, it is still as prevalent. we need to protect our skin. the melasma, the number one thing that makes it work is the sun. use the sunscreen even in this sunny bay area. >> how heavy of sunscreen should you use and what is really the optimal thing? >> that is an excellent question. i tell patient to use a brood spectrum sunscreen which has protection against ultraviolet 8 and ultraviolet b. so, look for blood spectrum. >> get -- get brood spectrum -- broad spectrum su
Search Results 250 to 299 of about 980 (some duplicates have been removed)